Introducing the Song of Songs

by Rachel Stenner I started editing Baldwin’s The Canticles or Balades of Salomon, phraselyke declared in Englysh Metres (1549)  a couple of weeks ago. It is his first major poetic work but, unlike the later Mirror for Magistrates, there’s barely anything published on this book (though, ahem, look out for two essays I have in … Continue reading Introducing the Song of Songs

The First Printed English Sonnet (and not by Surrey or Wyatt)

I’m starting my first textual editing project, working with Professor Scott Lucas of The Citadel, on The Collected Literary Works of William Baldwin. And this is the first of a series of very brief blog posts I will write to introduce each of Baldwin's individual texts. There will be many threads I leave untied in … Continue reading The First Printed English Sonnet (and not by Surrey or Wyatt)

Beware the Category: Human

Robert McKay I am a scholar of literature produced from the last third of the 20thcentury to the present. This is an era marked by world-changing discoveries about nonhuman animals’ intelligence, their rich capacities for feeling and embodied experience, their complex emotional and social lives, and the rights and human duties that many people recognise … Continue reading Beware the Category: Human

Putting the Cat on its feet: Baldwin’s ‘Beware the Cat’ and the process of stage adaptation

by Frances Babbage William Baldwin’s obscure sixteenth-century novel Beware the Cat is an improbable and distinctly challenging source for a dramatic adaptation. While the central storyline sounds rather promising – a curious scholar makes a potion that lets him understand the ‘secret language’ of cats! – at the level of accessibility, Baldwin is a very long … Continue reading Putting the Cat on its feet: Baldwin’s ‘Beware the Cat’ and the process of stage adaptation

A brief history of literary cats

by Charlotte Potter In Beware the Cat, William Baldwin asks the provocative question of whether cats can talk and reason. But he wasn't alone in wondering this. For centuries, writers have been inspired by the mysterious nature of cats, and English literature is populated by many eloquent, maverick, felines. Here are five of the most … Continue reading A brief history of literary cats